The Nation's Health + [Nutrition]

Breakfast comments

I received some wonderful comments to the What's for breakfast blog post.

Even though comments are viewable by clicking on them, I wanted to be sure these were readily visible, since they were so helpful and augmented the few suggestions I made. I'm impressed with the variety of foods people are willing to introduce into breakfast, particularly foods not traditionally thought to be part of standard American breakfast choices.

I normally eat a handful of almonds, some raw cashews, and occasionally an orange for breakfast. I used to eat cheese with breakfast also, but found once I began eating cheese it was hard for me to stop at one or two pieces.

Anonymous

My favorite breakfast is often left over Thai curry. I omit the rice. I also like making a thai omelet which is simply 2 eggs and some fish sauce and water and serving it with Sirachi sauce or Thai peanut sauce. It is street vendor food in Thailand I hear. Here's a recipe.

I find left over dinners are quite wonderful for breakfast. You just have to get past this notion that you have to eat certain foods at certain times in the day. Where'd that idea come from anyway?

Zute

I’ve tried eating oatmeal throughout my life, really wanting to like it. Until now the mere taste or smell of it made my stomach queasy. The key for me was toasting the oatmeal. Here’s what I generally do:

For Steel-cut oatmeal with the taste and texture of rice pudding-

In a frypan:
Toss 1 TBS of butter or so into a hot pan.
Add 1 cup of steel-cut oatmeal until toasted.
--few minutes
In a saucepan:
Boil 2-1/2 cups water
Add 1 cinnamon stick (or equivalent)
Add toasted Steel-cut oatmeal and cook for 15-20 minutes or so

Add 1-1/2 cups of low-fat milk, yogurt, or some combination, etc…
-Optional- Wisk an egg yolk into the milk.
-Optional- Add ¼ tsp salt.
-Optional- 2 TBS honey or Brown sugar. I use one 1 TBS of each.
Add some lemon or orange zest

Return to a boil for 10-15 minutes and then chill before eating. The oatmeal will congeal, resembling rice pudding.
Sprinkle more cinnamon/sugar on top
Add what you like: raisins, nuts, etc...

Use the cinnamon stick if you can, it really makes the difference. I’m constantly refining this recipe.

Anonymous

Once I decided to give up my (former) love affair with breakfast cereals, I was in a quandary about what to do for breakfast. I don't have much time in the morning to get creative and don't have the inclination at that time of the day to do so either.

I've settled on a routine of 2 hard-boiled (organic free-range) eggs (I boil them up a week in advance and leave them, shells-on, in the fridge), and a home-made protein-berry smoothie (frozen organic unsweetened berries, water-based).

This 8 am combo is easy, fast and tasty (I vary the berries and sometimes add natural flavour extracts for variety). It keeps my blood sugar flat and me full until my 1pm lunchtime. And I don't miss the cereals one bit!

Anonymous

I met an out-of-town friend for breakfast the other morning at a French-style bakery cafe. I ordered the goat cheese and herb omelet, but said I didn't want the potatoes or bread with it. They offered extra fruit or a salad instead. I chose the salad, with olive oil and vinegar. My friend wondered how I could eat a salad so early. Why not?

At home I usually eat 2 or 3 eggs over easy cooked in butter for breakfast most mornings and I am comfortably hungry for lunch about 3-4 hours later. But after my nicely filling cheese omelet and generous romaine salad (with a tiny bit of fruit - I ate the berries/melon and left the super-sweet pineapple), I wasn't hungry again until very late in the afternoon so had a small snack (cheese and half an apple) to hold me off and ate my next meal at dinner time. And it was a slow-developing comfortable hunger, not the powerful, "gotta eat something, anything" hunger that follows carb-heavy food.

Breakfast food, indeed!

Anna

You are absolutely right - breakfast is the most difficult meal to change. When I gave up wheat, I started using brown rice or potatoes mixed with anything interesting - nuts or meat or veges. I have now learned that these carbs make my blood glucose skyrocket. I have dropped the rice and potatoes and my BG has dropped nicely.

My favorite breakfast is sauteed veggies with some leftover meat or even an omelette. Soups are great in the AM. Nuts are for the days I am in a hurry.

Would be a little easier if I were not dairy intolerant.

Anne

Here in South India,it is 'Idli' - steam-cooked Lentil-rice (predominantly lentil) droppings, and 'Dosa' - lentil-rice pancakes. We have altered it a bit by increasing lentil ratio and dropping the rice to a minimum. Tastes good and fills you nice, for 4-5 hours.

Neelesh

I have two or three eggs, usually scrambled, but sunny-side-up and over-easy get thrown in for variety. I cook them using butter made from grass-fed cows. I also make my scrambled eggs using whipping cream instead of the more typical water or milk. I'll put a spoonful of fresh-made salsa over the top for some zing, some sliced cheese on the side and a cup of whole, organic milk to drink.

I'm completely sold on the "high-fat, moderate-protein, low-carb" diet and especially the admonition to start the day with a strong breakfast. My overall energy levels are fantastic, running performance is as good as high-school, and my belly hasn't looked this tight in decades.

Ross